Reset the iDRAC administrator password via ipmitool

In the previous post, I configured the iDRAC interface on a Dell server using ipmitool on CentOS. However, I ran into a problem, which I blame on poor user interface design:

When you log into the iDRAC web interface as root/calvin, it warns you that you are using the default username/password and prompts you to change the password. I did so by generating a random password in my password manager and pasting it into the password field.

The problem? The password can contain at most 20 characters, a limitation that is not obvious from the web interface. The password field on the iDRAC web interface truncates the password at 20 characters, and so I submitted a partial password. Then later, when I attempting to log it using the password saved in my password manager, it didn’t match. (For reasons that aren’t clear to me, submitting just the first 20 characters of the password saved in the password manager did not work either.)

I figured I was stuck and would have to go to the data center, reboot the server, and boot into the Lifecycle Controller in order to reset the iDRAC password. But I thought I’d see what I could do via ipmitool first.

From Configuring DRAC with ipmitool and ipmitool Cheatsheet:

Reset BMC/DRAC to default:

$ sudo ipmitool mc reset cold

The command was successful, but that did not reset the password for me.

From Resetting the BMC:

…you can reset the BMC to factory defaults with IPMICFG or ipmitool. Be aware that this will wipe any existing settings on the BMC that you may have set from the web interface, but excludes network settings.

# ipmitool raw 0x3c 0x40

But that did not work for me, and produced an error code. I spent some time trying to determine what the various raw hex values for ipmi meant, but that was not productive.

Eventually though I did hit upon an ipmitool command that worked:

$ sudo ipmitool user list 1
ID  Name	     Callin  Link Auth	IPMI Msg   Channel Priv Limit
1                    true    false      false      NO ACCESS
2   superuser        true    true       true       ADMINISTRATOR
3                    true    false      false      NO ACCESS

The username I configured corresponds with ID 2, so then I used ipmitool to set the password for that user:

$ sudo ipmitool user set password 2

I was prompted to enter the password, which I was then able to use to log in to the iDRAC web interface.

Using a Dockerfile to modify a container

In the previous post I modified a CentOS Docker container image to include the man application as a simple example. But it was not obvious looking at the container what modifications, if any, had been made. I wanted instead to specify the installation of man via a Dockerfile so that the modifications to the base OS would be more clear to another user.

First, I create a new empty directory and create a Dockerfile within the directory:

$ mkdir man-centos
$ cd man-centos
$ vi Dockerfile

In the Dockerfile, I specify that I want to use the publicly-available CentOS 7 base image, and then install the man package via yum:

# Start with CentOS 7
FROM centos:7

# Install the man yum module
RUN yum -y install man

Then build and run the container:

$ docker build -t man-centos .
$ docker run -i -t man-centos
[root@6f597c97d72d /]# man man
No manual entry for man

It works!

Running CentOS in a Docker container

I’m just getting started with Docker. I’ve thought for years that containerization is a great idea, but I haven’t actually done anything with containers yet. Time to get started.

I ran through a couple tutorials on the Docker docs site and created a account to get some basic familiarity.

I found the CentOS container repository on Docker Hub:

Let’s try running it!

$ docker pull centos
$ docker run centos

Did it do anything? It looks like it did something. At least, it didn’t give me an error. What did it do? How do I access it?

$ docker container ls

Nothing is actively running. That makes sense, because we’re not telling the containerized OS to do anything — it starts, it doesn’t have anything to do, and so it shuts down immediately. Instead we can tell it to run interactively and with a terminal by specifying a couple options:

-i, --interactive
-t, --tty
(“allocate a pseudo-TTY”, i.e. a terminal)
(see docker run --help for details)

$ docker run -i -t centos
[root@4f0b435cdbd7 /]#

I’m in!

What if I want to modify the container? Right now it is pretty bare-bones. For example, this doesn’t even have man installed:

[root@4f0b435cdbd7 /]# man man
bash: man: command not found

[root@4f0b435cdbd7 /]# yum install man
[root@4f0b435cdbd7 /]# man man
No manual entry for man

Quite the improvement! Now we need to save our change:

[root@4f0b435cdbd7 /]# exit

$ docker commit 4f0b435cdbd7 man-centos
$ docker run -i -t man-centos

[root@953c512d6707 /]# man man
No manual entry for man

Progress! Now we have a CentOS container where man is already installed. Exciting.

I can’t (that I know of) inspect the container and know whether or not man is installed without running it. That’s fine for many cases, but next I will attempt to figure out how specify via a Dockerfile that man is installed.

Error: Cannot contact any KDC for realm while getting initial credentials

I’ve been testing FreeIPA on a small network of CentOS 7 hosts (all virtual machines running in VirtualBox on a host-only network). After installing the IPA server on one host and creating the realm (IPA.OSRIC.NET), I installed the IPA client on one of the other hosts and tried running kinit:

# kinit admin
kinit: Cannot contact any KDC for realm 'IPA.OSRIC.NET' while getting initial credentials

Searching for that error brought me to Kinit won’t connect to a domain server. Although that did not describe the same issue, it did point me to the /etc/krb5.conf file. The realms section looked like it was missing something:

    pkinit_anchors = FILE:/etc/ipa/ca.crt


I added a kdc attribute:

    kdc =
    pkinit_anchors = FILE:/etc/ipa/ca.crt

No restart of any service was necessary. I ran kinit again and it worked:

# kinit admin
Password for admin@IPA.OSRIC.NET:

According to the krb5.conf documentation on realms:

The name or address of a host running a KDC for that realm. An optional port number, separated from the hostname by a colon, may be included.

I’m a Kerberos novice, but that seems like a necessary property. I’m not sure why the IPA client setup did not include it. I have a few more virtual machines to install the client on, so I’ll soon find if that behavior is consistent on subsequent installations.

Missing Nagios plugins in CentOS 7

I set up a Nagios server on a CentOS 7 VM (Virtual Machine):

sudo yum install epel-release
sudo yum install nrpe
sudo yum install nagios

By default it sets up some basic checks for localhost. When I checked the Nagios site at, I found that even PING was critical:

(No output on stdout) stderr: execvp(/usr/lib64/nagios/plugins/check_ping, ...) failed. errno is 2: No such file or directory

I checked the contents of the plugins directory:

# ls /usr/lib64/nagios/plugins
eventhandlers negate urlize

Sure enough, the usual suspects are not there. E.g.:

  • check_load
  • check_ping
  • check_disk
  • check_http
  • check_procs

Eventually I stumbled onto the following document, /usr/share/doc/nagios-plugins-2.0.3/README.Fedora:

Fedora users

Nagios plugins for Fedora have all been packaged separately. For
example, to isntall the check_http just install nagios-plugins-http.

All plugins are installed in the architecture dependent directory

I installed some of the plugins following that convention:

sudo yum install nagios-plugins-load
sudo yum install nagios-plugins-ping
sudo yum install nagios-plugins-disk
sudo yum install nagios-plugins-http
sudo yum install nagios-plugins-procs

Now the the corresponding plugins exist in /usr/lib64/nagios/plugins, and Nagios reports OK for those checks on localhost.